On this day 125 years ago: 26 July 1891

TRAFFIC CHAOS IN LONDON?  WHAT’S NEW?

Most of us fondly imagine that in the days before the motor car our streets were quiet, safe places where everyday life proceeded at a dignified, unhurried pace.  But when I glanced at Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper for this date in 1891 all my preconceptions were overturned.

Far from being the tranquil setting of our thoughts, the streets of Victorian London were choked with horse-drawn traffic of every kind, and those who ventured out of their houses risked life and limb.  The following reports are all taken from a single column in a single day’s edition of the newspaper:

William Phillips was taken to Greenwich Hospital ‘having been thrown from a cab, which collided with another at Lee.’

Eight-year-old Michael Smith of Southwark was treated in hospital after being run over by a brougham while crossing the road near his home.

Joseph Baggs, an employee at a printing office in the City, was passing a horse when the animal kicked him savagely.  He was found to be badly injured when taken to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital.

A man who was ‘thrown out of a trap at Clapham’ sustained a compound fracture to his leg, as well as scalp and other injuries.

In Gracechurch Street in the City of London, Charles Radhills was knocked down by a cab and had to be treated for ‘concussion of the brain’.

Henry Stone of Wandsworth was run over by a [horse-drawn] van, sustaining internal injuries.  He was taken to Charing Cross Hospital.

Thomas Fellings, 41, ‘received severe injuries to the back and head by being thrown from a cart at the Royal Albert Docks’.

And a 4-year-old boy named Mark Moses was killed.  According to Lloyd’s Newspaper, ‘The little fellow was playing in the road when he was run over by a vestry cart.’

The arrival of the motor-car a few years later can only have added to the danger.  The mind boggles at the confusion and mayhem which must have arisen when motorised and horse-drawn vehicles clashed in the maelstrom of London traffic!

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