On this day 125 years ago: 23 July 1891

CLASH OF THE TITANS

I was browsing the edition of The Times for this day 125 years ago when a report about two music-hall strong-men caught my eye.  On looking into this topic more closely, I found that these performers were the “pop-idols” of their day, and that intense rivalry existed between them.  I then discovered a book by Graeme Kent, The Strongest Men on Earth: When the Muscle Men Ruled Show Business, which tells their fascinating story in detail.  (Snippets are available to read on Google Books).

According to The Times, an artiste billed as “Sampson, the strongest man in the world”, had been performing at the London Aquarium a few days earlier, when 21-year-old John Marx, ‘a powerful-looking man described as a professional athlete and champion dumb-bell swinger’, bounded on to the stage and challenged “Sampson” to lift a steel bar weighing 320 pounds.  This, it seems, was a feat which even “the world’s strongest man” was incapable of achieving, and Marx then ‘created a disturbance’.  An assistant of Sampson’s approached Marx, who ‘felled him with a violent blow to the head’.  When Marx was brought before a court in London, the Magistrate, Sir Albert de Rutzen* remanded him on bail.

John Marx appears to have survived his brush with the law and gone on to enjoy considerable fame: a newspaper advertisement from 1899 – eight years later – shows him at the top of the bill at a Belfast theatre, ‘supported by thirteen variety artists’.

[*The name of Sir Albert de Rutzen seemed familiar to me.  Then I realised that he was the magistrate who, some years later, presided over an extradition hearing involving the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo, Charles Deville Wells, “gambler and fraudster extraordinaire”].

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