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Biography

Robin Quinn PhotoRobin Quinn is an author and radio producer based in South-East England. His new book, The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo explores the life of Charles Deville Wells, fraudster and gambler, and spans the second half of the nineteenth century and the early twentieth century. Published 2016 by The History Press Ltd.

THE MAN WHO BROKE THE BANK AT MONTE CARLO

The incredible true story of Charles Deville Wells, gambler and fraudster extraordinaire.

Charles Wells has two loves in his life: a beautiful, headstrong, French mistress, Jeannette, and his sumptuous yacht, the Palais Royal. At the risk of losing them both, Wells stakes everything he owns at the roulette tables in Monte Carlo’s world-famous Casino – and in the space of a few days he breaks the bank, not once but ten times, winning the equivalent of millions in today’s money.

Is he phenomenally lucky? Has he really invented an “infallible” gambling system, as he claims? Or is he just an exceptionally clever fraudster?

Based on painstaking research on both sides of the Channel and beyond, this biography reveals the incredible true story of the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo – an individual who went on to become Europe’s most wanted criminal, hunted by British and French police, and known in the press as “Monte Carlo Wells – the man with 36 aliases”.

Pre-order now: Amazon, Waterstones, WHSmiths, iTunes.
Read excerpts on Google Books.

HITLER'S LAST ARMY

After the Second World War 400,000 German servicemen were imprisoned on British soil – some remaining until 1948. These defeated men in their tattered uniforms were, in every sense, Hitler's Last Army.

Reviews of Hitler's Last Army

“Probably the best book on the subject in the last 20 years”
[recollectionsofwwii.blogspot.co.uk]

“I recommend this book as a must to read.”
[★★★★★ Amazon review by “a German ex-POW”]

“Well written, interesting, informative, and heart-warming in equal measure … I would recommend this even to those not especially interested in WW2, as a fascinating slice of Anglo-German social history of 70 years ago. Buy it."
[★★★★★ Amazon review by J.B.]

Blog: All Posts

  • After Hitler

    I’ve just caught up – a little belatedly – with an excellent programme on the Yesterday channel – a two-part series called After Hitler.  I was impressed by the exceptionally good script, the well-chosen archive footage and the effective narration.

    Among many important topics discussed, the programme reminds us that at the end of WW2 almost 11 million German servicemen finished up as POWs.  A British major, we are told, wrote of the astonishing absence in Germany of men between 17 and 40.  It had become “a land of women, children and old folk”.

    As many as 400,000 of the prisoners were held captive in Britain, and their experiences form the nucleus of my book, Hitler’s Last Army.

    Hitler's Last Army: Book Cove

  • “The best book I’ve read all year …”

    That’s what Nigel Jones, book reviewer for Devonshire magazine, writes in the latest edition which is out now.

    The man who broke the bank, Charles Deville Wells, lived at an address in Walker Terrace, Plymouth, from about 1883 to about 1887.  From here he registered a number of patents on his inventions, which included multiple-wick candles, advertising by means of balloons, electric baths, and a “combined fire extinguishing grenade and chandelier”!  Some years later, he returned in his sumptuous yacht, Palais Royal, and it was here that the finishing touches to the vessel were carried out by local shipwrights.

    Here’s an extract from Nigel’s review:

    You couldn’t really make up this story.  It’s actual real life stuff that’s both unbelievable, extraordinary and true.  It’s an epic story regarding the battle man faces to pay the bills (silver spoons excluded here).  Charles Deville Wells takes this battle to extraordinary levels in terms of perseverance, innovation and also trickery and fraud.  Initially an engineer, Wells takes to developing products which he patents and then seeks investors to reap the harvest, of which there’s usually none.  Later Wells indeed does break the bank at Monte Carlo, making unheard of amounts of money, then loses it on incredible projects and continues to evade the law and investors.  At one point, he bases his operation in Plymouth, so great local references also.

    The best book I’ve read all year, the level of research that’s gone into this excellent book by Robin Quinn is staggering.  A thoroughly entertaining, interesting read that’s highly recommended.

    P.S.  Christmas is coming! (How could we fail to notice!)  If someone you know likes Victorian crime books, buy them a copy of The Man who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo.  If they enjoy it as much as reviewer Nigel Jones evidently did, they should be in for a very happy Christmas!

    It’s available online from a variety of booksellers including Amazon, Waterstones, WH Smith, and iTunes.

  • 125 years ago
    man broke bank monte carlo robin quinn charles deville wells gambler fraudster extraordinaire
    A gambling hall at the Monte Carlo Casino, the Salle Touzet, named after the architect responsible for its design.  It first opened in 1890, was temporarily closed, and re-opened just after Charles Wells had broken the bank in November 1891.

    Charles Wells had reportedly won the equivalent of £6 million during the course of his two visits to Monte Carlo in 1891, first in the summer and then in early November.  Comment and gossip abounded for some time afterwards as journalists speculated on the reasons for his good fortune.  Wells himself always claimed to have developed an infallible system: but since he was trying to tempt wealthy investors to back him it was vital to convince them that he had a winning formula.  His claims were ridiculed by certain newspapers:

    ‘…what has been said about Mr. Wells’ “system” is all rubbish.  Mr Wells played no system worthy the name, and his good fortune was simply the result of his luck.’

    Other journalists referrred to a “put-up-job”, insinuating that Wells and his winnings were a fiction created by the Casino:

    ‘There are a good many ways of advertising, and for such a concern as that which flourishes at Monaco nothing could be more effectual than the stories of colossal winnings which from time to time issue from Monte Carlo, and make the round of the European press.’

    While rumours and theories swirled around the pages of the newspapers, one fact was beyond dispute.  Other people flocked to the principality en masse to try their luck:

    THE “WELLS” BOOM

    A telegram from Monte Carlo reports that ‘swarms of visitors’ have recently arrived at Monte Carlo, most of them possessed of the one idea of ‘breaking the bank’…

    Whatever his secret, Charles Wells was one of the main topics of conversation in Britain and elsewhere.  Following the lead of the popular press, people began to call him ‘Monte Carlo Wells’.  The name stuck, and for the rest of his life – and beyond – he was frequently referred to by this nickname.

    For a detailed discussion of how Wells broke the bank, please see my book, The Man who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo, especially pages 227-238.

    Other sources for this blog post: Sheffield Evening Telegraph, 18 and 19 November 1891; Aberdeen Free Press, 19 November 1891; Bridport News, 20 November 1891.  These newspapers can be accessed online via the British Newspaper Archive, which I thoroughly recommend: http://www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/  The site offers a free trial initially.  Various subscription packages are then available.  Having subscribed, if you do not renew you will sooner or later be offered one month of access to the site for just £1 to tempt you back!  This is unbeatable value.  (Please note that this is an unsolicited testimonial – I am a satisfied user of the site, but have no connection whatsoever with it).

  • The Germans who Stayed

    Back in September The Times published the obituary of Eduard Luedtke, who had just died at the age of 91.  The piece was headed ‘Last of the German prisoners of war who worked on English farms during the war and then settled here in peacetime’ (see my blog post of 1 November).  But in fact he was only one of the last.

    When the obituary appeared, ex-POW Theo Dengel contacted The Times to let them know that he was still alive and kicking —“or just about”.  Elsewhere a woman anxiously called her grandfather – another former prisoner of war – to make sure he was OK.

    Accordingly, a piece appeared in yesterday’s  Times (page 90), as part of the paper’s Armistice coverage.  Written by journalist Nigel Farndale, it mentions several of the surviving German ex-prisoners, while providing an excellent account of the 400,000 German POWs who were in Britain between 1939 and 1948.  Nigel used my book, Hitler’s Last Army, as a source of information for the feature and kindly acknowledged this in his piece.  Online version here.

  • Close to the Enemy

    The BBC Two drama, Close to the Enemy tells the story of a German scientist just after WW2 who is brought to Britain to help with the development of the jet engine.

    The series is based on actual events.  The Times of 7 May 1946 reported:

    German scientists, many of whom are leading aeronautical authorities, are coming to Britain to cooperate with British scientists in hastening the development of aero-dynamics, to solve the problems created by the jet engine … When Britain captured the air speed record of 606 m.p.h., jet engines had to be held back.  They could easily have gone on at a greater speed if the development in aero-dynamics and in the structure of aeroplanes had kept pace with the progress of the jet engine.  Since then the jet engine had forged ahead again and its development was going on by leaps and bounds …

    … The scientists, all of whom are non-Nazis, will work at Farnborough, Hants, where they will live in a special hostel and will be waited on by German prisoners of war.  They have been working in German research stations and will be paid the same salaries as they received there.

    … In the disarmament of Germany … it was decided that this vital realm of research should not be left intact in Germany … America, Russia, and Britain had now agreed that so many of these scientists should go to each of the three countries to cooperate with their own scientists.  About 25 would be coming to this country.

    In Hitler’s Last Army I describe many of the other occupations in which German prisoners of war were engaged in Britain, both during and after the war.  Many people would be astonished to learn, for example, that trusted German POWs were given the task of compiling records of Nazis who were wanted for war crimes; other detainees had the job of keeping an up-to-date index of all POWs in British camps.

    To watch Close to the Enemy on the BBC i-player, click here