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Biography

Robin Quinn PhotoRobin Quinn is an author and radio producer based in South-East England. His new book, The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo explores the life of Charles Deville Wells, fraudster and gambler, and spans the second half of the nineteenth century and the early twentieth century. Published 2016 by The History Press Ltd.

THE MAN WHO BROKE THE BANK AT MONTE CARLO

The incredible true story of Charles Deville Wells, gambler and fraudster extraordinaire.

Charles Wells has two loves in his life: a beautiful, headstrong, French mistress, Jeannette, and his sumptuous yacht, the Palais Royal. At the risk of losing them both, Wells stakes everything he owns at the roulette tables in Monte Carlo’s world-famous Casino – and in the space of a few days he breaks the bank, not once but ten times, winning the equivalent of millions in today’s money.

Is he phenomenally lucky? Has he really invented an “infallible” gambling system, as he claims? Or is he just an exceptionally clever fraudster?

Based on painstaking research on both sides of the Channel and beyond, this biography reveals the incredible true story of the man who broke the bank at Monte Carlo – an individual who went on to become Europe’s most wanted criminal, hunted by British and French police, and known in the press as “Monte Carlo Wells – the man with 36 aliases”.

Pre-order now: Amazon, Waterstones, WHSmiths, iTunes.
Read excerpts on Google Books.

HITLER'S LAST ARMY

After the Second World War 400,000 German servicemen were imprisoned on British soil – some remaining until 1948. These defeated men in their tattered uniforms were, in every sense, Hitler's Last Army.

Reviews of Hitler's Last Army

“Probably the best book on the subject in the last 20 years”
[recollectionsofwwii.blogspot.co.uk]

“I recommend this book as a must to read.”
[★★★★★ Amazon review by “a German ex-POW”]

“Well written, interesting, informative, and heart-warming in equal measure … I would recommend this even to those not especially interested in WW2, as a fascinating slice of Anglo-German social history of 70 years ago. Buy it."
[★★★★★ Amazon review by J.B.]

Blog: All Posts

  • The Mike Read Show

    Yesterday I joined Mike Read on his BBC Radio Berkshire show to chat about Hitler’s Last Army.

    We talked about prisoner of war camps in Berkshire, and I mentioned that German POWs were at one time housed in the former winter quarters of Bertram Mills’ Circus near the race course at Ascot.  Accommodation for some prisoners was found in what had once been the elephant house!

    Mike also asked about escapes: we’ve all seen movies such as The Great Escape which depicts the mass breakout of Allied POWs from a camp in Germany.  On the whole, there were relatively few escape attempts by German prisoners.  Luftwaffe pilot Franz von Werra – subject of another film, The One That Got Away – jumped from a moving train in Canada, made his way back to Germany, was decorated by Adolf Hitler himself, and flew again in combat.  (It was a short-lived return to action, as his plane crashed into the sea soon afterwards, and his remains were never found).  But as Hitler’s Last Army reveals, von Werra was not the only German to escape, or even the first …

  • Sue Dougan : Radio Cambridgeshire

    Yesterday I joined Sue Dougan on BBC Radio Cambridgeshire at mid-day.

    We talked in particular about how the German POWs were gradually accepted by most members of the British public.  I’ve always felt that this says a great deal  for the Germans themselves: they are generally remembered as reliable workers who were respectful towards British civilians.  After five years of war, the Brits – understandably – had a bad opinion of Germany, and the prisoners had to make positive efforts to overturn that opinion.

    The British, too, showed remarkable generosity and forgiveness.  One former POW told me how he was invited into an Englishman’s house not long after the war had ended, and was warmly received.  And the first thought to enter the prisoner’s mind was, “Why did we fight?”

  • Amazon Review

    Delighted to see that a reader has given Hitler’s Last Army a five-star rating on Amazon, together with a nice review!

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hitlers-Last-Army-German-Britain/dp/0752482750/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1421748986&sr=1-1&keywords=hitler%27s+last+army

  • Zero hour!

    For many of us this is our first day back at work after the Christmas and/or New Year break.  Not necessarily an exciting prospect, fo some, no doubt.  But I’ve been looking forward to it for some time as my first book, Hitler’s Last Army is released today.

    The book focuses on the human story of the German prisoners of war who were held in Britain during and after WW2: I interviewed a number of former German soldiers and supplemented this evidence with material from the Imperial War Museum.  http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections-research

    As a backdrop to this eye-witness testimony, I’ve referred also to the military, political and economic decisions which impacted on the lives of the POWs.

    I think you’ll find the personal testimony of these men both fascinating and at times very moving …  but please do let me know what you think of the book, as I’d love to have your views, comments and suggestions!

    The book is aimed at general readers – not just those with a specialised interest in the war.  But I suspect that some will have have a particular motive to read about the POWs – either because they were themselves a prisoner, or because a relative was.  I’d be glad to hear your story (or that of your ancestor) so please get in touch.  If you have any questions about German POWs that aren’t covered in the book, I may be able to help, or at least point you in the direction of some useful sources of information.  info@robin-quinn.co.uk

  • Research trip to France

    france_0377

    Spent several days in France last September researching my biography of Charles Wells, (The Man Who Broke the Bank at Monte Carlo).  We took in several cities, including Marseille, where Charles Wells lived for some years before becoming famous for his Monte Carlo exploits.  He lived with his parents at the house pictured here.  More from the photo album in future posts!